Turkey economy – Sile Agva http://sile-agva.com/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 00:52:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sile-agva.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Turkey economy – Sile Agva http://sile-agva.com/ 32 32 Turkey enters northeastern Syria to show Erdogan can solve … https://sile-agva.com/turkey-enters-northeastern-syria-to-show-erdogan-can-solve/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 11:23:05 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/turkey-enters-northeastern-syria-to-show-erdogan-can-solve/ (MENAFN – Syndication Bureau) AFP Photo: Nazeer Al-khatib Note: This article was distributed to Syndication Bureau clients on October 9, ahead of the start of the Turkish campaign in Syria later today. It has been slightly modified to reflect this fact. Turkey is now in the midst of a major assault in northeastern Syria, unexpectedly […]]]>

(MENAFN – Syndication Bureau) AFP Photo: Nazeer Al-khatib

Note: This article was distributed to Syndication Bureau clients on October 9, ahead of the start of the Turkish campaign in Syria later today. It has been slightly modified to reflect this fact.

Turkey is now in the midst of a major assault in northeastern Syria, unexpectedly lit up by President Donald Trump following a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on the night of October 6. At an astonished national security establishment in Washington, Trump said US forces will not stand in the way of Turkish forces who want to clear a distance of 20 miles [30-kilometer] corridor within Syria to establish what Ankara calls a “terrorism-free” security zone.

As he did in a previous phone call with Trump in December, Erdogan was once again successful in convincing his American counterpart that Turkey would deal with the IS threat in northern Syria. That December phone call prompted Trump to declare the withdrawal of US forces from Syria, which also shocked US military advisers. It was no coincidence that James Mattis resigned his post as Secretary of Defense shortly thereafter. Military advisers ultimately convinced the president to slow down the withdrawal.

Fast forward to this month and this time, senior Pentagon officials were again caught off guard and frustrated as well. Even Republican leaders normally loyal to Congress expressed strong disapproval. Their main concern is twofold. First, the US withdrawal is a blow to American credibility and a betrayal of the Kurdish allies who trusted the United States in their fight against ISIS. Second, the main beneficiaries of the US exit will be Russia, Iran and the Syrian regime.

The main problem plaguing Turkish-American relations is the fact that while Washington views ISIS as the main terrorist threat, Ankara views Kurdish forces as its main enemy. This is why, for Erdogan, the easiest way to convince Trump to make such periodic declarations of US exit from Syria is to assure him that the Turkish military can handle the danger posed by ISIS. Yet it is clear that the Turkish military regards the YPG, the Kurdish militia linked to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, as the top priority in northern Syria. In Ankara’s eyes, ISIS is a secondary concern and one which, in any case, seems to be contained after the Kurdish-American victory in Raqqa. Turkey’s primary strategic objective is clear: to stop the emergence of a Kurdish autonomous zone in Syria.

Given the overwhelming backlash from the US media, the national security establishment, and Congress, Trump recalibrated his position on October 7 with a tweet warning Ankara that if the Turkish military goes “out of bounds,” the states -United would “wipe out” the Turkish economy. Given the mercurial and erratic policymaking style of the White House, it is still unclear how far the Turkish military incursion into northeastern Syria will be allowed. For their part, Kurdish forces in Syria have said they will retaliate.

At this point, the Syrian Kurds have considerable influence on the ground as they hold 12,000 ISIS prisoners in several detention centers, as well as some 58,000 relatives of those prisoners at Al-Hol camp. in northeastern Syria. The Kurds could easily free these prisoners to prove that Turkey in fact has no power to control the terrorist threat.

Why then is Erdogan so willing to launch this military operation? The short answer is to distract from the problems that are building up at home, which have become urgent over the past 12 months with the deteriorating economy. Rising unemployment, high inflation and a loss of consumer confidence cost him the municipal elections this summer. His party has been defeated in Istanbul and other major cities.

Economic recessions always create scapegoats. Today, the majority of Turks regard the 3.6 million Syrian refugees in their country as an economic handicap. It is therefore not surprising that Erdogan is now insisting that Turkey needs a safe zone in which to settle a large part of these refugees. In doing so, he wants to show his political base that he can “solve” the problem.

A simple cost-benefit analysis, however, indicates that a military incursion will have serious drawbacks for Ankara. For starters, there could be serious economic consequences. There are already a series of military and economic sanctions that Congress wants to implement in response to Turkey’s purchase of the S-400 missile defense system from Russia. Now, if something is wrong, it would only take a few angry tweets from Trump for the Turkish economy to collapse again, as it did in 2017 when the chief US tweeter criticized Erdogan for not to have released an American pastor detained in Turkey. .

Another mistake in Turkey’s strategic calculations is the hope that a safe zone can turn into an area where Syrian refugees can be transplanted. Why would refugees in Turkey agree to go to a war zone where the Turkish army will fight Kurdish forces?

In fact, Turkey risks finding itself in a very difficult position. Consider the following probable scenario: the Syrians in Turkey will not leave; relations with Washington will be poisoned; economic situation to deteriorate as Trump lashes out at Turkey after Syrian Kurds release detained ISIS fighters and their families; Russia and Iran will eventually ask the Turkish army to leave Syria; the Damascus regime will denounce Turkey as an invader; and Turkey could very well get bogged down in a war of attrition with the YPG.

It is not clear exactly how Turkish-American relations will play out in the coming weeks. What is certain, however, is that Turkey is entering a very difficult new phase in its relations with Washington.

Omer Taspinar is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and professor of national security strategy at the National Defense University in Washington.

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Recent Developments in Turkey’s Hydrogen Energy Strategies https://sile-agva.com/recent-developments-in-turkeys-hydrogen-energy-strategies/ Fri, 27 Aug 2021 09:22:57 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/recent-developments-in-turkeys-hydrogen-energy-strategies/ Authors: Dr. Döne Yalçın, Managing Partner at CMS Turkey and Taner Elmas, Associate at CMS | Istanbul | Turkey By increasing the use of hydrogen, Turkey aims to take a step towards the use of cleaner resources and thus become less dependent on imported energy. This is of great importance as Turkey’s energy strategy focuses […]]]>

Authors: Dr. Döne Yalçın, Managing Partner at CMS Turkey and Taner Elmas, Associate at CMS | Istanbul | Turkey

By increasing the use of hydrogen, Turkey aims to take a step towards the use of cleaner resources and thus become less dependent on imported energy. This is of great importance as Turkey’s energy strategy focuses on local energy sources.

According to the roadmap announced in the World Energy Transition Outlook Report of the International Renewable Energy Agency, the demand for electricity produced from hydrogen is expected to reach 21,000 terawatt-hours per year by 2050. However, even if determining factors are behind the global expansion of hydrogen production and renewable energies as well as the energy transition, there are obstacles that prevent hydrogen from establishing itself as a source of energy in the industry. These barriers include high costs, sustainability issues, lack of demand, lack of suitable energy system structures, and lack of technical and commercial standards.

Government policies and strategies can help overcome barriers to hydrogen production. Turkey’s efforts in this direction have paved the way for new investment and expansion in various sectors. The efforts in hydrogen-focused projects result from the importance of the use of renewable energies and hydrogen production in Turkey. Hydrogen is expected to become a common energy source in the future. This article focuses on Turkey’s hydrogen energy strategy, the link between renewables and hydrogen, and innovations in the field of hydrogen energy in Turkey.

Priority sectors for the Turkish hydrogen energy strategy

The Minister of Energy and Natural Resources (the “Minister) explained the growing use of hydrogen in various sectors – including renewables, heating and transportation – during the energy exploration workshop. By increasing the use of hydrogen, Turkey aims to take a step towards the use of cleaner resources and thus become less dependent on imported energy. This is of great importance as Turkey’s energy strategy focuses on local energy sources. This includes decarbonising heating, increasing the production of hydrogen from local sources, and increasing the use of boron as a material for storing and conserving hydrogen.

The priority objectives of the 2021 hydrogen use plan concern the natural gas sector. The introduction of hydrogen into the natural gas distribution system is expected to begin at the end of 2021. As hydrogen offers cost advantages in the transportation sector, the integration of hydrogen energy in industry transport is also receiving a lot of attention around the world. The Minister stressed that the production of hydrogen from domestic coal by volatilization allows clean transport. As an example, the minister cited that a bus can travel 1,030 kilometers on hydrogen produced from one ton of coal, indicating that Turkey’s substantial coal reserves could be used for such cause.

The results of research on the production and use of hydrogen thus reinforce the concept of clean energy use in the world.

Hydrogen energy in Turkey as renewable energy

The production of hydrogen from natural gas and renewable energy sources has grown considerably, in particular due to increased investment. In addition, it is envisaged that in the next period the production will be entirely powered by renewable energies. According to a report by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), hydrogen plays a crucial role as a resource, especially in heavy industry and transport.

EBRD commissioners highlighted Turkey’s role in using hydrogen as a source of renewable energy. The renewable energy potential in Turkey offers a suitable area for the production of hydrogen energy. EBRD commissioners also said demand for hydrogen currently comes mainly from Europe. If Turkey intends to develop a green electricity market and decarbonize the economy, its high potential in renewable energies should be an asset in this area. The EBRD head for green economy and climate action in Turkey mentioned that the production of green hydrogen and its export to Europe could be a crucial opportunity for Turkish exporters in the decade (10 ) years, even if no hydrogen target has been set.

Innovations in the field of hydrogen energy in Turkey

Canadian clean energy solutions company Xebec Adsorption announced that its subsidiary HyGear has activated the on-site hydrogen generation system at the Turkish lubricant oil refinery “Tayras”. Xebec Adsorption said: “The hydrogen generation system managed by ‘Tayras’ will be the first such example in Turkey. The fully automated system will deliver approximately 560 kg of hydrogen per day (205 tonnes per year) at a pressure of 125 bar under a 15-year gas-as-a-service contract. One of the most remarkable aspects is the economic contribution that the plant will make. In addition, the emissions of lubricating oils based on API Group II will be reduced. This will be a milestone in the area of ​​“Turkey’s first green hydrogen plant”.

Conclusion

Hydrogen plays a crucial role in a clean and secure energy future. It knows an unprecedented political and commercial momentum. Policies and projects are developing rapidly around the world to overcome obstacles to the use of hydrogen as a source of energy.

Turkey’s hydrogen production strategy focuses on the use of hydrogen as an energy source in many areas. One of the main objectives of strategy development is indigenous production. If implemented, this strategy will bring positive results for Turkey in many ways. In addition to the Turkish strategy, projects are being implemented which attract the attention of foreign investors in the field of hydrogen production. Therefore, studies, strategies and investments are underway to ensure the development of Turkey in terms of hydrogen production and use of gas as a resource. It is expected that these developments will gradually intensify and the integration of hydrogen into practice will accelerate day by day.


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Turkey strengthens border to block wave of Afghan migrants https://sile-agva.com/turkey-strengthens-border-to-block-wave-of-afghan-migrants/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 00:55:00 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/turkey-strengthens-border-to-block-wave-of-afghan-migrants/ Turkey currently hosts nearly 4 million Syrian refugees Taliban takeover in Afghanistan sparks concern over new wave of migrants Erdogan says Turkey will not be “Europe’s migrants storage unit” Repatriation of Afghans interrupted due to current situation in the country VAN, Turkey, Aug.22 (Reuters) – Afghans who manage to cross Iran on foot to the […]]]>
  • Turkey currently hosts nearly 4 million Syrian refugees
  • Taliban takeover in Afghanistan sparks concern over new wave of migrants
  • Erdogan says Turkey will not be “Europe’s migrants storage unit”
  • Repatriation of Afghans interrupted due to current situation in the country

VAN, Turkey, Aug.22 (Reuters) – Afghans who manage to cross Iran on foot to the Turkish border run into a three-meter-high wall, ditches or barbed wire as Turkish authorities step up their efforts. efforts to block any refugee influx into the country.

The strengthening of border measures in Turkey, which already hosts nearly 4 million Syrian refugees and is a step for many migrants trying to reach Europe, began when the Taliban began to advance in Afghanistan and took control from Kabul last week.

Authorities plan to add an additional 64 km by the end of the year to a border wall started in 2017. Ditches, wires and security patrols will cover the remainder of the 560 km border.

“We want to show the whole world that our borders are impassable,” Mehmet Emin Bilmez, governor of the eastern border province of Van, told Reuters at the weekend. “Our greatest hope is that there is no wave of migrants from Afghanistan.”

Turkey is not the only country to erect barriers: its neighbor Greece has just completed a 40 km fence and a surveillance system to remove migrants who still manage to enter Turkey and try to reach the Union European. Read more

Authorities say there are 182,000 registered Afghan migrants in Turkey and up to 120,000 unregistered. President Tayyip Erdogan urged European countries to take responsibility for any further influx, warning that Turkey does not intend to become “Europe’s migrant storage unit”.

The number of irregular Afghan migrants detained in Turkey so far this year is less than a fifth of the number detained in 2019, and officials say they have yet to see signs of a major increase since the victory Taliban last week, although the long distances mean refugees could take weeks to arrive.

The Turkish side of the mountainous border with Iran is lined with bases and watchtowers. Patrol cars monitor movements on the Iranian side around the clock, from where migrants, smugglers and Kurdish militants frequently attempt to cross into Turkey.

Migrants who are seen crossing the border are sent back to the Iranian side, although most return and try again, according to security forces.

“No matter how many high-level steps you take, there may be those who sidestep them from time to time,” Bilmez said.

A Turkish Coast Guard boat prepares for a patrol at Lake Van in the border town of Van, Turkey on August 22, 2021. REUTERS / Murad Sezer

‘LET US STAY’

Roads from the border are lined with checkpoints. Successful migrants are hidden by smugglers in houses – often dirty and dilapidated buildings underground or in deeply dried up riverbeds – while waiting to be transferred to western Turkey.

On Saturday, police captured 25 migrants, mostly Afghans, behind a dilapidated building in the Hacibekir neighborhood of Van.

“We thought we will have facilities here, we will win to support our parents. There, there are Taliban killing us,” said Zaynullah, 20, one of the detainees. He said he arrived in Turkey two days earlier after traveling on foot for 80 days.

Those captured are taken for health and safety checks at a processing center. There, Seyyed Fahim Mousavi, a 26-year-old, said he fled his home in Kabul a month ago, before the Taliban arrived, fearing they would kill him because he had worked as a driver for Americans and Turks.

His 22-year-old wife, Morsal, said they crossed Iran mainly on foot to escape the Taliban.

“They hurt women. After raping them, they kill them. They behead the men,” she said, holding her two children, aged two and five. “We don’t want to go back. Let’s just let ourselves stay here.”

After treatment, migrants are taken to a repatriation center, where they can spend up to 12 months before being returned to their country of origin. Those repatriations have been halted for Afghans now, leaving around 7,500 Afghans in limbo in various repatriation centers.

Ramazan Secilmis, deputy head of the migration directorate, said his organization was working to identify those in need of protection from the Taliban for resettlement in third countries.

“Those in need of protection must be separated from those who come to our country for economic reasons. We cannot automatically expel anyone just because they have Afghan nationality,” he said.

Reporting by Ali Kucukgocmen; Editing by Dominic Evans and Hugh Lawson

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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SC Midlands Turkey Plant Aims to Advance Automation and Food Safety in Meat Packaging Industry | Colombian Affairs https://sile-agva.com/sc-midlands-turkey-plant-aims-to-advance-automation-and-food-safety-in-meat-packaging-industry-colombian-affairs/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/sc-midlands-turkey-plant-aims-to-advance-automation-and-food-safety-in-meat-packaging-industry-colombian-affairs/ COLUMBIA – When Ron Prestage first considered moving a branch of his family’s turkey farm to Camden five years ago, he was going to need 700 workers to run the processing plant. With the use of automation, that number will be reduced to 300 when the $ 150 million Prestage Farms facility is operational in […]]]>

COLUMBIA – When Ron Prestage first considered moving a branch of his family’s turkey farm to Camden five years ago, he was going to need 700 workers to run the processing plant.

With the use of automation, that number will be reduced to 300 when the $ 150 million Prestage Farms facility is operational in late 2022.

“There will be very, very few people in this plant who actually have a knife in their hands,” Prestage said of the common sight in other meat packing plants. “It’s going to be done with the automation equipment that does these types of jobs that Americans are so difficult to hire today.”

Between the automated operation and a meat cooling process that uses air rather than a water bath to reduce water consumption and prevent cross-contamination, the site near Camden will be unique from the rest. Western Hemisphere turkey processing plants, Prestage said.

In addition to bringing technological advancements to Kershaw County, the project also marks the county’s largest investment announcement since the 1960s.

“I think this will be cutting edge technology that will continue to advance,” said Jeff Burgess, county economic development manager.

For example, a magnetometer and x-ray will be used after the boning process, looking for bone or metal that isn’t supposed to be there, a task that is usually done visually.

There will be a smart scale, said Prestage, which sorts birds by size so that machines can make precise cuts in the meat – technology that was not available ten years ago.

The meat packaging industry has historically been slow to adopt and has struggled to implement automated technologies. Variable carcass sizes and the need for precise cuts make the job more difficult for the machines.

Major redevelopment could reshape Georgetown over the next decade to attract residents and tourists

But with the onslaught of COVID-19, industry giants are now embarking on robotics with more urgency.

While some of the automated processes used at Camden can be found in other US factories, Prestage said he is not aware of any that uses them all together as his company intends.

Processing plants typically employed 3.2 workers per 1,000 square feet of space, three times the national average for manufacturers, according to data compiled by the Boston Consulting Group, the Wall Street Journal reported.

At 300,000 square feet, the ratio at the Prestage Farm facility in Camden will be 1 person per 1,000 square feet.

The family business achieves this with technology more often integrated into European meat factories.

Get all the latest news from the Midlands industry, plus exclusive development news and more, delivered to your inbox every week.

The technology means that a single worker in factories in Sweden, Denmark and France does the work of eight or nine workers in American factories, although operations run at a slower pace, according to the Journal.

“Building a factory like this costs a lot more money, but to be honest every 100 workers is $ 5 million a year in manpower,” Prestage said.

Machines represent 38% of Prestage Farm’s total investment, but the company will make up much of the difference in labor savings.

Due to the food safety measures it implements, Prestage also wins by selling better quality meat with a longer shelf life.

“There is a lot of curiosity in this factory across the country,” Prestage said, and if it works well, he expects others to modernize their own operations in its wake.

Prestage Farms has already embraced a lot of automation in its Iowa pork, using cameras and sensors to measure and make cuts of meat, Prestage said. But the sophisticated software needed to run it is still being debugged, which means that performance, while improving since the technology was installed a year and a half ago, has not reached the levels that Prestage would like to see.

North Charleston Cooper River Park and Marina awarded $ 1 million for revitalization

Prestage hopes the safer, more automated nature of its packaging plants will make jobs more attractive and help attract workers in today’s tight labor market.

The factory also offers a four-day work week and an average wage of $ 18 to $ 20 for a line worker, higher wages for those working in software and administration. In total, the facility will have an annual payroll of $ 15 million, Prestage said.

The plant will process heavy male turkeys, called “toms,” weighing around 45 pounds. It will process about 8 million poultry per year, less than some of the larger operators, but a large amount for a plant with only one shift per day.

Products leaving the factory will be sold to other companies and exporters for further processing into deli meats and ground turkey.

With facilities in seven states and over 2,700 employees, Prestage Farms has been operating in South Carolina since 1994, hiring 125 farmers to raise turkeys.

Vets for the Camden equestrian community, Prestage and his wife arrived in the small town 30 miles northeast of Columbia 38 years ago, eventually bringing his family’s business with him.

In addition to the new Midlands plant, Prestage Farms processes hen turkeys at a plant in North Carolina and hogs in Iowa.

The route will also avoid potential delays via the Panama Canal and ships will not have to anchor off the coast of California before unloading.

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Emerging market policymakers grappling with rising inflation https://sile-agva.com/emerging-market-policymakers-grappling-with-rising-inflation/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 07:30:08 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/emerging-market-policymakers-grappling-with-rising-inflation/ August 21, 2021 WASHINGTON DC IYOUR SUMMER a few long months for the emerging world. Punitive temperatures – July was the hottest month on record in the world, according to recent analysis – stoked fires on Turkey’s Mediterranean shores and scorched Russia’s wheat fields. Covid-19 is raging in countries with low vaccination rates. Only 24% […]]]>

IYOUR SUMMER a few long months for the emerging world. Punitive temperatures – July was the hottest month on record in the world, according to recent analysis – stoked fires on Turkey’s Mediterranean shores and scorched Russia’s wheat fields. Covid-19 is raging in countries with low vaccination rates. Only 24% of Brazilians, 9% of Indians and 7% of South Africans are double-bitten. On top of everything else, inflation is also accelerating.

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Soaring food and energy prices have pushed inflation to unusually high levels. In Brazil, consumer prices are 9% higher than a year ago (see graph), more than double the central bank’s target. In Russia, inflation is 6.5%, well above the central bank’s 4% target. Inflation in India, which had been high in 2020, topped 6% this summer, north of the Reserve Bank’s target range. Policymakers in the poorest countries have taken a difficult path this year. The surge in high prices puts another severe test at their feet.

Growth has largely resumed, despite the continued ravages of covid-19. In parts of the emerging world, such as India, production has already returned to pre-pandemic levels. In others, like Russia, it is expected to do so by the end of the year. Soaring prices for oil, metals and agricultural products have been a boon for commodity exporters. But the recoveries have been frustrating and patchy. Better times for export industries have not always translated into a broader labor market recovery. Business is booming in Brazil’s mining towns, for example, but the unemployment rate across the country, at 14.6%, has barely declined from its pandemic peak.

This, in turn, has put pressure on governments to extend or even increase spending on relief programs. Economic growth is increasing tax revenues in many countries, improving public finances which have been battered by covid-19. Yet budget deficits remain significant. A decision in June to expand grain distributions means India’s central government is likely to borrow more than the 6.8 percent of GDP forecast in the 2022 budget. Brazil, which borrowed 13.4% of GDP last year, expanded its emergency cash transfers. Chile and Colombia, which limited their borrowing to a modest 7% of GDP in 2020 last year, plan to borrow about as much or more this year, according to the Institute of International Finance, a group of bankers.

However, when you combine more money flowing through the economy with supply disruptions, the result is inflationary pressure. Central bankers in emerging markets, like their counterparts in the rich world, argue that high inflation is only temporary. But, unlike their counterparts in the advanced economy, some did not feel comfortable enough to wait and see. They have more recent experience with spurts of high inflation and doubt that public expectations of low inflation are as firmly anchored as in rich countries. They therefore acted forcefully to curb inflation. Brazil’s central bank raised interest rates by one percentage point on August 4, in addition to three increases of 0.75 percentage points each since March. The Central Bank of Russia also announced a one-point hike on July 23, also the fourth of the year. Mexico and Peru raised interest rates on August 12. The other central banks that have held the fire are expected to tighten in the coming months.

This desire to curb inflation may have caught the interest of foreign investors. Earlier this year, some economists feared that a meteoric recovery in America and the prospect of rising interest rates could lead to a money rush in emerging economies: an echo of the ‘taper tantrum’ of 2013 , when the Federal Reserve began to normalize monetary policy. policy after the financial crisis. A rise in US Treasury yields in February and March of this year was accompanied by a slowdown in portfolio flows to emerging markets, pointing to the worst to come.

That didn’t materialize, however, and not just because Treasury yields fell from their spring highs. It also reflects a stronger policy framework in emerging economies and greater resilience to market fluctuations. Over the past decades, they have built up foreign exchange reserves and limited their dependence on foreign currency debt. Most survived a severe squeeze in March 2020, when panicked investors flocked to havens and emerging market currencies tumbled, with minimal economic damage.

By comparison, recent exchange rate movements have been modest, which has limited the extent to which higher import prices add to inflationary pressures. Since the start of the year, the Brazilian real and the Indian rupee have depreciated by around 2% against the dollar. (The real fell nearly a quarter last year and about 20% during the 2013 turmoil.) Central bank vigilance likely helped keep investors from getting cautious.

But higher interest rates are a difficult home remedy. Large increases represent a risk to growth. Slower growth in turn hurts public coffers, even as higher interest rates increase government borrowing costs. Among the large emerging economies, the risk of crisis is perhaps most palpable in Brazil, where a loss of confidence in public finances contributed to a deep recession in 2015 and 2016. If the fiscal risk premium demanded by buyers bond market continues to rise, so the government could soon be faced with a terrible choice between cutting spending as unemployment remains high and a widespread fiscal crisis. Indeed, on August 12, Roberto Campos Neto, head of the central bank of Brazil, worried that the markets were beginning to perceive a “budgetary deterioration” which could jeopardize the economic recovery.

The recent woes only worsen the inflation problem and threatens to spread to other countries. A severe drought in Brazil has reduced the capacity of its hydropower plants and caused energy prices to skyrocket. It also threatens the production of export crops like coffee, leading to reduced supplies and higher prices. The low levels of the Paraná River have forced companies like Vale, a mining company, to cut loads of iron ore carried on barges, causing global shortages. The Russian government taxes overseas shipments of wheat, which is pushing up prices around the world.

The fever could drop later in the year, as bottlenecks ease and demand from America and China cools a bit. Yet there is also a risk of further disruption: further epidemics of covid-19, more natural disasters or social unrest, perhaps linked to rising food prices. And for exporters like Brazil, falling commodity prices lead to their own problems, like a falling currency and an economic slowdown. A turnaround in one country could worsen investor sentiment towards other countries. Emerging markets have managed the economic tensions of the past 18 months with courage. But a break from the heat can’t come soon enough.

For a more expert analysis of the biggest stories in economics, business and markets, sign up for Money Talks, our weekly newsletter.

This article appeared in the Finance and Economics section of the print edition under the title “Feel the Heat”

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Trendyol Raises $ 1.5 Billion at $ 16.5 Billion Valuation – TechCrunch https://sile-agva.com/trendyol-raises-1-5-billion-at-16-5-billion-valuation-techcrunch/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 15:45:00 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/trendyol-raises-1-5-billion-at-16-5-billion-valuation-techcrunch/ Tendency, a Turkey-based e-commerce platform, raised $ 1.5 billion in a massive funding round that values ​​the company at $ 16.5 billion. General Atlantic, SoftBank Vision Fund 2, Princeville Capital and sovereign wealth funds, ADQ (UAE) and Qatar Investment Authority co-led the cycle. The deal is SoftBank’s first in the country. The new funding also […]]]>

Tendency, a Turkey-based e-commerce platform, raised $ 1.5 billion in a massive funding round that values ​​the company at $ 16.5 billion. General Atlantic, SoftBank Vision Fund 2, Princeville Capital and sovereign wealth funds, ADQ (UAE) and Qatar Investment Authority co-led the cycle.

The deal is SoftBank’s first in the country.

The new funding also makes Trendyol Turkey’s premier decacorn and one of Europe’s most valued private tech companies. It comes just months after strategic – and majority – support from Alibaba invested $ 350 million in the company at a valuation of $ 9.4 billion.

Founded in 2010, Trendyol is Turkey’s largest e-commerce company, serving over 30 million shoppers and delivering over one million packages per day. It claims to have gone from a marketplace to a ‘superapp’ by combining its marketplace platform (which is powered by Trendyol Express, its own last mile delivery solution) with instant grocery and food delivery through its own messaging network (Trendyol Go), its wallet (Trendyol Pay), consumer-to-consumer channel (Dolap) and other services.

Image credits: Founder Demet Mutlu / Trendyol

Trendyol founder Demet Suzan Mutlu said the new capital will go towards expansion in Turkey and around the world. Specifically, the company plans to continue investing in nationwide infrastructure, technology and logistics and accelerating the digitization of Turkish SMEs. She said the company was founded to create a positive impact and that she intends to continue this mission.

Evren Ucok, president of Trendyol, added that part of the company’s goal is to create new export channels for Turkish traders and manufacturers.

Melis Kahya Akar, managing director and consumer manager for EMEA at General Atlantic, said Trendyol’s market model – ranging from grocery delivery to mobile wallets – “brings convenience and ease to consumers” in Turkey and to abroad.

“Turkey is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and boasts an attractive demographics, with a young population that is very active online,” General Atlantic’s Kahya Akar wrote via email. “We expect its already large e-commerce market – $ 17 billion in 2020 – to continue to grow significantly through increasing online penetration. We believe Trendyol is uniquely positioned to meet the needs of consumers in Turkey and around the world as the business grows.

A 2020 JPMorgan report found that E-commerce only made up 5.3% of the Turkish retail market at the time, but Turkish e-commerce had seen impressive increases in revenue in recent years: 2018 alone saw the market jump 42%, followed by 31% in 2019. As in 2020, 67% of the Turkish population shopped online.

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Turkey lifts limits on protective masks and glove exports https://sile-agva.com/turkey-lifts-limits-on-protective-masks-and-glove-exports/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 11:33:22 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/turkey-lifts-limits-on-protective-masks-and-glove-exports/ Turkish companies producing protective masks and medical gloves will no longer have to acquire prior authorization to export abroad, according to a recent decision. The related opinion on the statement from the Ministry of Commerce on goods whose exports were either prohibited or subject to prior authorizations was published in the Official Journal on Friday. […]]]>

Turkish companies producing protective masks and medical gloves will no longer have to acquire prior authorization to export abroad, according to a recent decision.

The related opinion on the statement from the Ministry of Commerce on goods whose exports were either prohibited or subject to prior authorizations was published in the Official Journal on Friday.

This eliminated the need to obtain prior approval for the export of protective masks (gas, dust and nuclear fallout masks) sold under the Personal Protective Equipment and Sterile Medical Gloves Regulation / non-sterile supplied to the market under the Medical Device Regulation. .

Protective masks and gloves, which were on the list of goods subject to prior authorization last year as part of COVID-19 measures, have thus been removed from this list.

Over the past year, there has been a huge increase in the sale of products commonly used against the spread of the virus, namely face masks, disinfections and traditional Turkish cologne, a powerful disinfectant used by many. to ward off the threat of coronavirus.

N95 masks and other types of protective masks that were previously only used by health workers or particular professional groups have become a part of daily life since the start of the epidemic.

According to the 2020 Turkish Statistical Institute (TurkStat) annual industry products statistics, some 56.5 million masks were sold in 2019, up from 8.14 billion last year, with a jump about 144 times.

Cologne sales increased from 36.83 million liters to 103.9 million liters. Sales of cologne have increased almost twice.

Sales of cleaning products such as soap and wet wipes increased from 302.34 million kilograms to 445.81 million kilograms.

While 31.89 million kilograms of substances were sold as disinfectants, this amount reached 119.15 million kilograms in 2020. Sales of these substances have increased by about three times.

Sales of nonwoven fabrics, used in protective gear, increased from 500.91 million kilograms to 783.15 million kilograms, the data also showed.

Meanwhile, some 4.33 billion TL of medical drugs were produced in 2019. This figure rose to 4.64 billion TL last year.

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Pakistan calls on China, Turkey for advanced military drones https://sile-agva.com/pakistan-calls-on-china-turkey-for-advanced-military-drones/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 13:34:52 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/pakistan-calls-on-china-turkey-for-advanced-military-drones/ Despite its economic challenges and empty coffers, Pakistani government Imran Khan has been busy purchasing advanced weapons to bolster its military forces amid unrest in neighboring Afghanistan, and to create unrest in Jammu and Kashmir in India. Ignoring skyrocketing debt and rising import costs along with low incomes, Pakistan is in talks with all-time friends […]]]>

Despite its economic challenges and empty coffers, Pakistani government Imran Khan has been busy purchasing advanced weapons to bolster its military forces amid unrest in neighboring Afghanistan, and to create unrest in Jammu and Kashmir in India.

Ignoring skyrocketing debt and rising import costs along with low incomes, Pakistan is in talks with all-time friends China and Turkey to acquire drones for them.

Loong-II Wing

According to intelligence sources, the Pakistani Air Force is acquiring two additional Wing Loong-II unmanned aerial vehicles, a ground control station and other related equipment worth $ 44.4 million.

Developed by the Chinese Chengdu Aircraft Industry Group, the Wing Loong-II is a remote-controlled drone intended for use in surveillance, aerial reconnaissance and precision strikes. It has long range strike capability with satellite link.

Defense experts say the drones will enhance Pakistan’s capabilities in the context of India’s purchase of the Russian S-400 air defense system which is expected to join the service later this year.

The Pakistani Air Force has received a commercial proposal from the China National Aero-Technology Import & Export Corporation for these drones. CATIC, which is a Chinese representative of the aviation industry in the global market, has agreed to supply the equipment by July 2022.

Currently, PAF has in its inventory 3 Wing Loong-II drones, acquired in 2020-21 with an AG-300 missile system, and has deployed one to its western border with Afghanistan.

According to the sources, the other two are stationed to protect the China-Pakistan economic corridor and the People’s Liberation Army’s new navy base in Gwadar port.

India will acquire 10 US-built MQ-9 Reaper or Predator B armed drones each for its army, navy and air force. The Defense Acquisition Council, headed by Defense Minister Rajnath Singh, could take the final call next week about the $ 3 billion deal, a government source said.

Kargu: the Turkish kamikaze drone

Turkey was a pioneer in low cost armed unmanned aerial vehicles. Drones have proven their capabilities in the field and reshaped battlefields and geopolitics.

Drones have been used in several recent regional conflicts in which they have been seen to hunt down armored vehicles and air defense systems with pinpoint accuracy. Drones have been used in Syria, Libya and in the war between Armenia and Azerbaijan.

According to the sources, Pakistan has expressed interest in the Turkish kamikaze drone “Kargu”.

Kargu has a range of 10 km and can carry six rockets. A remote station can be used for ten drones at a time.

Recently, Turkey signed an agreement for the export of Kargu drones. “#Turkey signs 1st agreement to sell its autonomous rotary wing attack drone #Kamikaze Drone (#Kargu). The name of the country has not been disclosed. Delivery will take place in 2021. Kargu can operate at the both as a single platform as well as as part of a swarm of up to 20 platforms, ”said Dr Ali Bakir, Turkish analyst and assistant professor at the Ibn Khaldon Center at Qatar University, in a report. tweet.

“We are proud to announce that #KARGU is ready for delivery to an export customer. Serving in the Turkish Armed Forces for over three years, #KARGU is now ready to support our friends and allies around the world . #AlwaysOnDuty #STMDefence @SSB_Eng, “STM Defense, the maker of the Kamikaze drone, said in a tweet

Kamikaze drones – also known as suicide drones – eliminate the enemy by self-destruction. These drones are similar to missiles and carry explosives.

Matrix 300 RTK Drone

The Pakistani military has also received a proposal for the acquisition of the Matrice 300 RTK drone from DJI with a Zenmuse H20T quad sensor, payload and advanced enterprise drone. The proposal was forwarded by Karachi-based technology company ABM Satuma.

The Matrice 300 RTK has a flight time of up to 55 minutes, supports up to three payloads and six directional detection and positioning systems simultaneously.

S-250 MUAV tests

According to the sources, the Pakistani military is also keen to procure hybrid specification MUAVs. “An ABM Satuma team trained 13 Pakistani army officers,” sources said.

Intelligence agencies said the Pakistani military conducted mini-unmanned systems Supercam S-250 operations at Muzaffarabad airfield from July 7 to 17. It is considered one of the best unmanned aerial vehicles in terms of tactical and technical characteristics and is suitable for border areas.

These Supercam S-250 mini drones are used for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance exercises. These mini drones can fly for about three hours and have a range of 150 km.

According to the sources, the trials are taking place in Bahawalpur, Turbat and Muzaffarabad from July 26 to August 13.

Currently, the Pakistani military has five S-250 mini drone systems (1 system means two drones).

Joint Venture in the field of vagrant ammunition

Chinese state-owned Aerospace Long-March International Trade Co and Pakistani military in talks for research and development collaboration and joint venture for the deployment of stray munitions including WS-43, CH-901 and ZT -39V.

The Pakistani army has requested a visit of its 4 to 5 members to ALIT China from August 17 to 22 this year. According to defense experts, these drones are bought in China and Turkey by Pakistan to strengthen their capabilities against India and Afghanistan.

Last updated Aug 4, 2021, 7:04 PM IST

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Turkey: Health Cluster Bulletin, June 2021 – Turkey https://sile-agva.com/turkey-health-cluster-bulletin-june-2021-turkey/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 08:24:44 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/turkey-health-cluster-bulletin-june-2021-turkey/ Strong points • A month before members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) agree on the future of UNSCR 2533 (2020), the delivery of UN aid in the north -Western Syria (NWS) risks not reaching, via the border, millions of Syrians in need who are currently living in very serious security and economic conditions. […]]]>

Strong points

• A month before members of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) agree on the future of UNSCR 2533 (2020), the delivery of UN aid in the north -Western Syria (NWS) risks not reaching, via the border, millions of Syrians in need who are currently living in very serious security and economic conditions. They will lose access to essential humanitarian aid in the event that UNSCR 2533 is not renewed.

• The safety and well-being of humanitarian workers in northwestern Syria has been affected this month, and hostilities in the southern Idlib region escalated seriously this month. A health center in Afrin was severely damaged and more than 13 people were killed, including four aid workers and eleven staff were injured, including a critically ill midwife.

• This unfortunate attack on health care resulted in the suspension of vital essential health services and caused total and partial structural damage to the health facility. The contact details of the health facility were shared as part of the UN-led humanitarian deconfliction / notification mechanism, and it had already been targeted in October 2019.

• The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases continues to rise in the NWS, albeit at a slightly slower pace than last month. A total of 25,661 confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been reported in the NWS. However,

11.82% of confirmed cases were reported in camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs), which is a high percentage for overcrowded sites.
More efforts are needed to sensitize the community to apply preventive measures, more screening and increase acceptance of vaccination among the population.

• Along with the COVID-19 response, the vaccination campaign continues in Aleppo and Idleb. The first phase of the campaign began on May 1, 2021, targeting healthcare and humanitarian workers. The total number of cases vaccinated in the first phase is 17,783.

• Funding continues to be a serious challenge for humanitarian assistance in the NWS. In the shadow of the decision to be taken for resolution 2533 (2020) of the United Nations Security Council (UNSCR), donors have been forced to suspend the provision of funds before getting a clear picture on how to get aid to millions of Syrians in the NWS. . An urgent increase in funding is needed because only “39% of the funding, needed to support the response between July and September 2021”, has been received by humanitarian organizations ******.

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Unesco asks Turkey to report on Hagia Sophia after mosque change https://sile-agva.com/unesco-asks-turkey-to-report-on-hagia-sophia-after-mosque-change/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 16:12:40 +0000 https://sile-agva.com/unesco-asks-turkey-to-report-on-hagia-sophia-after-mosque-change/ Muslims offer prayers on the first day of Eid Al Adha outside the iconic Hagia Sophia in Istanbul’s historic Sultan Ahmed district on July 20, 2021. Image Credit: AP Istanbul: The World Heritage Committee of the United Nations cultural agency, Unesco, on Friday asked Turkey to submit a report on the state of conservation of […]]]>

Muslims offer prayers on the first day of Eid Al Adha outside the iconic Hagia Sophia in Istanbul’s historic Sultan Ahmed district on July 20, 2021.
Image Credit: AP

Istanbul: The World Heritage Committee of the United Nations cultural agency, Unesco, on Friday asked Turkey to submit a report on the state of conservation of Hagia Sophia by early next year , expressing its “serious concern” about the consequences of its conversion into a mosque.

Turkey’s decision last year to convert the revered Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia Cathedral from a museum to a mosque has sparked fury in the international community and added to tensions with Greece.

A month later, Ankara ordered the conversion of another old Orthodox church into a mosque.

The Holy Savior of Chora was a medieval Byzantine church decorated with 14th century frescoes from the Last Judgment which remain valuable in the Christian world.

Both changes reflect President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s efforts to galvanize his more conservative and nationalist supporters at a time when Turkey suffers from economic hardship caused by the coronavirus.

The United Nations body’s World Heritage Committee requested Turkey to submit by 1 February 2022 “an updated report on the state of conservation of the property”.

He said he “deeply regrets the lack of dialogue and information” on Turkey’s intention to change the status of the Hagia Sophia and Chora museums.

The committee expressed “grave concern at the potential impact of changes on these key elements on the Outstanding Universal Value of the property” and urged Turkey to engage in international cooperation and dialogue before further changes are made. major are implemented on the property.

The World Heritage Committee meets in China for its annual session to review its list of sites with the coveted UNESCO World Heritage label, which is seen as boosting prestige and tourism.

If he is not satisfied with the state of conservation of a site it can be classified as endangered or even deleted, as happened this year with the waterfront in the English city of Liverpool.

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